How the AA predicts we’re driving home this Christmas

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas, even on the road…

We’re in December; the weather is getting colder, Christmas songs are playing on repeat over the tannoy and there are decorations enveloping the city centre. As the festive season gets into full swing, the question remains: how are we getting home this year?

How are we getting home?

A recent press release from the Automotive Association (also known as the AA) has predicted the answer to this very query. According to their predictions, on the 16th December, approximately 52% of the population will be driving, meaning an estimated 17 million cars will be on the road during the day and night.

But what about the big day itself? According to the AA, approximately 44% of the population will be driving on Christmas Day. This means that an estimated 14 million cars will be on the road, either driving to see family and making their way home.

New Year’s Day is not much better: approximately 40% of the population (an estimated 13 million cars) will be on the road, raring to celebrate Big Ben’s chimes.

Will we see delays?

Inevitably, this will lead to delays. The AA advises the public to expect a few delays, particularly those planning to use the M25 or the M6 coming out of Bristol and Weston Super-Mare. You can also expect delays on the M1 to the north of Luton.

In the press release, president of the AA, Edmund King, said “It’s a bumper to bumper Christmas this year, as people want to make up for lost time.” He went on to assure the public that “Our five star patrol will be working throughout the holidays to fix cars that suffer.”

But what day does Mr King think will be the quietest this year? Surprisingly, he foresees this being New Year’s Day: “New Year’s Day will be the quietest day on the roads, especially if drivers have been partying the previous evening”, he says.

All in all, this Christmas, there will be many cars making their way home. Be sure to check the travel reports before you plan your journey to minimise delays.

Image Source: Unsplash: Samuel Scrimshaw