Ex-city council chief executive to be awarded for his service

Canterbury City Council are due to award a new Honorary Freeman of the City of Canterbury next Wednesday (May 11).

Colin Carmichael was Canterbury city council chief executive for 25 years and 8 months, he left the position in March 2021 welcoming the new senior management structure of Tricia Marshall , Peter Davie and Suzi Wakeham.

Carmichaels role meant he was responsible for it corporate management and the co-ordination and planning of the council services. He was responsible for 500 staff members, and has been apart of the economic growth and the arts in the city.

The former chief executive help see the redevelopment of the Marlowe Theatre and the Beaney House of Art and Knowledge and the establishment of the Canterbury 4 Business Board and he kept n active role as a member of the Canterbury Festival Board.

Throughout his time working for the council he was able to shape and support the education within the city by participating on governing bodies for Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury College and the University of Kent for multiple years.

Prior to his arrival in Canterbury in 1996 he was apart of the London boroughs of Hackney and Camden. throughout his time at the city council he was awarded an OBE in 2013 for his service to local government.

Throughout his time working for the council he was able to shape and support the education within the city by participating on governing bodies for Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury College and the University of Kent for multiple years.

He has been noticed specially for his great commitment to the life and well-being of the City of Canterbury over his years of working for the council.

The extraordinary, Freedom of the City Council meeting will take place on the 11th of May 2022 at 19:00, at the Guildhall St Peter’s Place, Canterbury at 7pm to discuss Carmicheal’s service to the city and awarding him this title.

Freedom of the City is on of the highest honour a city can award some of importance to the city. Nowadays the role is mainly ceremonial, with those holding the title not holding power in the city council.

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